“Nature is not surprised by us, we are surprised by nature…”

Our Vision…

The Lacking availability of effective drugs against some of the most common human viral pathogens delays vaccine development and allows for the emergence of resistant strains.  This highlights the need for novel antivirals, as well as innovative methods to facilitate their discovery. In an attempt to study how viruses affect the host, and vice versa, our lab focuses on proteolytic cleavage. Many viruses rely on the cleavage of their proteome by both virally-encoded and host proteases. In order to monitor protease activity the laboratory, we develop cell-based assays which can be used for the study of proteolysis as well as for the search of antivirals. By exploiting the power of flow cytometry, and retroviral technology, we monitor cleavage in different cellular compartments and develop multiplexed applications. We also study the effect of viral infection and viral proteins on signaling cascades. HIV-1 taken as proof of principle, we are interested in other RNA viruses including many members of the Flaviviridae family of viruses such as Dengue virus, West Nile virus and Zika virus.